Nairobi, Sep 5 (EFE) .- The Alliance for the Green Revolution in Africa (AGRA), an organization that seeks to transform subsistence agriculture into an economic engine, today called for more political support for the agricultural sector to progress and become a leader in the fight against poverty.

This report, published today, coincides with the start of the Forum for the African Green Revolution (AGRF), to be held in the capital of Rwanda, Kigali, until next Saturday.

The organization explains in the dossier that African countries should take as an example the Asian nations, and points out that it would be necessary for executives to reinforce their support to the agricultural sector and implement transformation strategies.

 

 

According to the conclusions of the AGRA, the millions of small family farms in the continent produce most of the food consumed in the African continent, but their productive capacity is much lower, comparatively, than the global average.

“Governments are key to promoting an inclusive agricultural transformation agenda, which seeks to underscore the importance of strengthening national planning, coordination and implementation capacity while supporting the development of an effective private sector and an enabling regulatory framework” , considers the president of AGRA, Agnes Kalibata.

Although the models to be imitated, according to the report, are countries such as China, Vietnam or South Korea, examples are also cited within Africa, such as Ethiopia or Rwanda; countries in which the Government has been a protagonist in agricultural reforms.

In the last 25 years, Ethiopia has managed to reduce poverty rates by half, based on the growth of the agricultural sector; and in the case of Rwanda, poverty has decreased by 25 percent.

Also, the dossier indicates that other nations of the continent such as Ghana, Kenya, Burkina Faso, Mali or Zambia are taking steps forward in this matter.

Among the proposals proposed by AGRA are the establishment of clear long-term plans, the linkage between policies and real commercial opportunities for small-scale farmers, the facilitation of the business environment or the integration of the agricultural sector with others such as energy or infrastructure. 

Originally published on La Vanguardia